welcome

Call me Sueyi.
Call me Sue-Sue.
Call me Sue.
Just don't call me lil fry.

A 19 yr old :

Finding her niche in the passionate world of white coats and stethoscopes.

Missing Malaysian food so badly, that she drowns her sorrow by surfing food blogs.

Who watches scary movies only with friends who have high pain threshold (from all that pinching)

Who has very cold extremities, ask my stimulated patients, oops sorry, "simulated patients"

Who loves a good laugh with candid, thick-skinned friends

Who cannot stay surrounded by 4 walls for more than a few hours

Who loves her loved ones so so much


:)

shout outs



endless wishes

char siew bao.

blueberry muffins.

hot Milo and crackers.

a neverending supply of Daddy's socks.

Bear hugs. Warm kisses. Lots of Love.

My own beach chalet.

Bubble baths.

Shining sun and rainbows.

Sexy stilettos.

Dancing.

Me

I wear socks.Even with heels.

I play with my earlobes.

I have a Mongolian mole.

My family means the world to me. "Family means no one gets left behind"

I like cheekiness. You cheeky, me cheeky.

I heart my close friends, the ones who know me in and out, the ones who've grown with me.

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and when she speaks

Thursday, March 19, 2009

"Sometimes we think we're doing our best for them. But our best isn't exactly what's best for them; and what's worse is when it isn't what they want either...

Human beings are such that we like to impose..."
This was what Dr Siew said to me this morning.


Old people dying with a terminally ill condition should receive a palliative care referral. And if your loved one is one who has not; and he/she is suffering immensely; then speak to the doctor-in-charge regarding consulting a palliative care team or hospice care.

I've seen it over and over again how dying patients suffer at the hands of their loved ones who unintentionally believe they're doing the right thing for the patient.

Sometimes the right thing is to not do anything but to let them go peacefully. With dignity and with what's left of any quality of life possible.

A family of daughters I know who took care of their terminally ill father with end-stage-renal disease insisted on dialysing their father despite the very grave prognosis.

Dialysis is not itself an answer to many of the problems encountered when your kidneys fail; especially so when you're so frail, fragile and vulnerable. It has its own bag of risks as well...
He was already palliative ie we did what we could to ensure no difficulty breathing, no pain of any sort; etc... It was understood no more invasive treatments that would cause discomfort or pain of any sort should be administered.

Yet... they went ahead without letting us know; and brought him to a private hospital.
They insisted on dialysis... and their father had a major complication from one of the dialysis sessions; he bled internally and starting pooping out blood.

He was wheeled into surgery (he was an old 91 year old man) and his blood pressure fell rapidly. There was nothing that could have saved him.

He wanted to live to a ripe old 100 years.
But that wasn't possible. He didn't want dialysis. He wanted Chinese accupuncture.

They should have respected it. We already gave them the green light to let him do as he pleases because at this point; it's more keeping him happy and doing what we can to make him comfortable.

When they found out what had happened with regards to his father being rushed for an emergent surgery, his daughters wanted to see their father breathe his very last-but they were denied that opportunity.

When they finally did get to see him; he was dead and lifeless on the bed.

I could only imagine what he must have felt when the doctors and nurses were rushing to try and revive him whilst he was in the process of dying.
Frozen with fear? Without a doubt.

Where were his loved ones?

Why did he have to go like this?

He was helpless. dying. unable to fight. unable to have his wishes and decisions respected, despite him being close to death. At least let him have his last dying wish granted.

I am sure if they could turn back time, they'd have wished they hadn't decided on dialysing him. And went ahead with what he wanted and requested for.

No one can say how long he would have been able to live if he hadn't gone for dialysis; but dialysis brought along mroe risks than benefits and despite them knowing this; they thought it was the right thing to do. Instead of passing away comfortably and with loved ones by his side, he had to pass on abruptly and unexpectedly too soon.

Sometimes; what you feel is for their own good might not necessarily be what's best for them.So please judge and weigh the pros/cons carefully before deciding how they are going to live the rest of their short, remaining lifespan.

To add to the grief of his daughters who were not allowed to see their father, they were also furious at the fact that their dead father had no blanket to cover him up. And the room was 'freezing'. The worst thing was he was in a private hospital. A very very expensive one, at that.

That's private hospital care for you and it just goes to show all the money in the world cannot buy your dying ones comfort on their last journey if you're unlucky.

Hearing stories like this happening on a frequent basis; it makes me furious at how lack & inhumane & UNcompassionate hospital care can sometimes be...

As for my part, what I can do and will do is to advocate & educate people on end-of-life issues and on quality of life in terminally ill patients.

Spreading by word of mouth; starting with family and friends is the easiest way to get this going.

It's sad how there's so little being done with regards to educating the public on health and life/death issues like this.

her
STORY,
her ALIBIS
9:57 PM;;